Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Theresa Schubert | The forestal psyche

For this project, Theresa Schubert dedicated herself to the potential of slime moulds, mosses and lichens from the forests around Berlin. Slime moulds are the largest known single-celled organisms and live from decaying matter on the forest floor. Certain mosses and lichens are natural remedies as well as indicators of good air quality. Apart from a scientific approach, forests have always been places of myths, legends and fantasies.

Theresa Schubert gave a lecture on the first evening  of the workshop (25 August), which introduced her work and the subject in particular. On the following day (26 August) she led an excursion to the area surrounding Berlin, with the goal of finding organisms in the natural forest habitat, that Schubert has used in her art. Particularly interesting specimens were collected, examined and classified using biotechnological methods.
The use of field microscopes enabled an initial analysis directly on site, making a later artistic evaluation and implementation possible visually and audibly. (More information)






















All photos (c) Tim Deussen/ Studio Deussen


With the generous support of:

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Lecture & Performative Workshop Margherita Pevere | Anatomy of an inter-connected system

15 July, 2017, 2-6PM Starting point of this seminar is the artist’s research at the junction of visual arts, theoretical inquiry and investigation of biological processes. The seminarfocussed on the discourses regarding human-nature relationship in the frame of today’s environmental crisis and how artistic practices involving living organisms and technology can innovatively contribute to the debate. How can artists problematise the complex interconnection between humans and the biosphere in a hyper-technological era? With what kind of aesthetic and ethical implications? The project aimed at engaging the audience in a performative discussion with a visual outcome.












The seminar was structured in two parts: a presentation and a participative performance. In the presentation, Pevere will introduced key concepts in the history of human relationship towards nature and how these have influenced society, religion and knowledge production. How did humans perceive nature in the Middle Ages? And in the Renaissance? How did this affect society and the arts? What are Anthropocentrism and the Anthropocene? Moving from this theoretical overview, Pevere critically presented her own artistic practice along with a selection of other artist’s works involving organic matter and technology. In the participative performance, the artist  engaged with the audience on the themes of anthropocentrism and relationships between human and non-human living beings. (More information)












All photos (c) Tim Deussen/ Studio Deussen

With the generous support of:
 

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Alanna Lynch | Gut feelings Performative Lecture & workshop

18 June, 2017, 2-6PM
As part of her ongoing research Alanna Lynch has been growing the micro-organisms that produce kombucha tea. Through the process of fermentation this symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeasts (SCOBY) produces a cellulose material that is slimy and smells strongly while wet and can be dried and used as a textile. However, Lynch's interest in working with this life form goes beyond the material properties. Throughout this research Lynch has been actively consuming the microorganisms by drinking the tea. Given that about half of the cells in the human body are bacterial cells and acknowledging the microbiome-gut-brain axis whereby bacteria in the gut have been shown to effect the mind, how people think, feel and even behave, bacteria can be seen as radical in the potential it has to challenge categories such as subject/object, mind/body and human/non-human.








Lynch presented her research in the form of a performative lecture and workshop, a format that reflects the interdisciplinarity of the content. She discussed theoretical issues including notions of subjectivity and agency while serving the kombucha drink to participants. In this way they became physically implicated in the work. The lecture  not only presented facts and ideas but made use of a strong affective dimension. The workshopexplored the aesthetic and sensory properties of the SCOBY in a hands-on session that was wet and messy. A strong focus in the performance was on the smell and the substance in relation to our bodies, both inside and out. At the end participants will got a sample to take home, where they can continue to grow it on their own, making the substance literally contagious.














 All photos (c) Tim Deussen/ Studio Deussen

With the generous support of: